3D-Print a House in 20 Hours

3D-Print a House in 20 Hours

I remember growing up in an area of Colorado under heavy construction. We constantly had houses being built around the neighborhood and being the danger-ignorant young ones we were, we would constantly go play with all of the materials left over. Thank god for Tetanus shots, because with the number of holes in my feet from these activities I (and my parents) certainly got their money’s worth. Then the dumpsters would be filled with extra wood scraps that were inevitably used to our own imaginations. Usually another unsafe activity (tree houses, bike ramps, wood fights).

Cookie cutter designed suburbs are now a common occurrence. Besides the aesthetic appeal, or lack there of, there are quite a few problems to consider in the modern construction industry: Materials are wasted. Labor can be unreliable and expensive. Construction is also one of the most dangerous industries. Time also becomes a major issue. The largest expense to construction is the actual construction which includes labor and materials. (New Home Construction Cost Breakdown) No doubt 3d-printing can remedy many of these issues.

This video has some good points to it. It basically reiterates the expenses of time, labor, human safety, materials, and money that are completely unnecessary with current technology in the construction industry. The drawing of the massive 3d printer is a bit unrealistic. A much smaller 3d printer on a track that traced the walls would be much more feasible, especially in regards to already available technology.

Another factor to consider is the growing variety of materials available. 3d-printed wood, 3d-printed concrete, 3d-printed glass, and 3d-printed plastic are all viable building materials. The next step would be using materials in the immediate surrounding, perhaps with a bonding agent. Dirt and sand could soon be developed into useful filament. It would be the ultimate solution for the cheapest most efficient housing: using the materials available to everyone as building materials as opposed to importing wood or concrete. Especially with the growing number of people without proper housing, 3d printing is developing into a important construction technology.

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[…] Cookie cutter designed suburbs are now a common occurrence. Besides the aesthetic appeal, or lack there of, there are quite a few problems to consider in the modern construction industry: Materials are wasted. Labor can be unreliable and expensive. Construction is also one of the most dangerous industries. Time also becomes a major issue. The largest expense to construction is the actual construction which includes labor and materials.No doubt 3d-printing can remedy many of these issues.  […]

[…] was already predicted in a Ted Talk that there would be 3d-printed houses made in under 20 hours. We aren’t quite there, but this is a massive step in that direction. […]

[…] was already predicted in a Ted Talk that there would be 3d-printed houses made in under 20 hours. We aren’t quite there, but this is a massive step in that […]

[…] to print giant blocks to make a house fitting to the iconic architecture of Amsterdam. There was a Ted talk about the use of 3d-printing to make housing in low income areas in less than 20 hours using giant […]

[…] to print giant blocks to make a house fitting to the iconic architecture of Amsterdam. There was a Ted talk about the use of 3d-printing to make housing in low income areas in less than 20 hours using giant […]

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